Hi everyone

You dont have to, but its interesting!

MAIN WEBSITE: www.wheelchairdriver.com

Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 12 Jun 2017, 21:27

Hi all,

RTC in 2007 left me unable to bear weight on my leg.
The impact scrambled the nerves in my knee/leg so everything translates as pain.
Have an old manual Remploy chair with a leg attachment as my knee can no longer bend.
Ideally at some point I'd like to retrofit an optional motor as my shoulder dislocates.

I wanted a clamp on trike conversion for a while, but as I need to brace myself for pain in my knee and back from uneven paving slabs I'm terrified of pot-holes and speed bumps. The cost soon put a stop to that idea.
The thought turned to making one. It should be cheaper, could buy parts one at a time, and by building it I'd get an idea on how to fix it should the need arise. By documenting everything I could combat any memory problems and hopefully help someone else in a similar situation. That's the idea anyway.

Q.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 12 Jun 2017, 22:50

Do yourself a big favour. Buy an OUTDOOR/indoor powerchair. Bigger softer riding tyres, suspension on 4 wheels, adequate seating comfort, way better control and range. Trying to power a manual chair is just rolling all the bad points of both into one!

My opinion...
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 14 Jun 2017, 16:15

I couldn't agree more. It would solve so many problems and give me the means to get out of the street without assistance. I wish we had the money and space for a proper chair. Regrettably we have neither.
I know the chair I have is naff, but modifying it is our only realistic option.
If we visit my in-laws, we can only just manage to get the chair in as it is.

What I had in mind was something like this: http://www.mobilitysmart.cc/lightweight-powerstroll-dual-wheel.html but faster than 3mph, and £400 is out of budget. I know that's cheap by so many standards, and it may be that we never will be able to buy something like that, but parts must be available. Even if it's a part every few months, and controlled by a Raspberry Pi or Arduino?
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 14 Jun 2017, 16:58

Parts will cost you as much as a decent chair.

The reason thats 3mph is because faster needs bigger better motors, batteries, controller for the same inadequate range. Ant then its not portable... Or cheap.

I just got a 6mph (now 8 after programming) brushless, invacare storm 3 with about 2 days use. With power tilt, and recline. eBay. Still has the bobbles on the tyres, been stored unused in a dusty shed and was his dads. He put 2 new MK batteries on, to make it work for selling and I ended up paying 400. Its as new but dusty. You wont build anything worth having for less. And it will be useless in comparison. Or try wheelchair services for a free one.

Just watch eBay for a couple of months. The deals crop up! Nobody buys, contact before, then email after the auction with a daft offer.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 15 Jun 2017, 14:23

Nice. Sounds like you've got one hell of a bargain. Bobbles and all.

I was afraid of this. You've just confirmed all of my searches.
The only ones I've seen which are faster (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLr8wu3v7bLW7zJlzSHd5bRKuCobnNLAvu) have been the trike conversions, and they're even further out of the price range.
I'd also given some thought to a scooter conversion. If I bought parts from something like funbikes.co.uk for a 1KW scooter, I could get parts in as and when we could afford it.

In reality I think I ought to focus on something like Froglegs and/or Loopwheels (or variations) to add some level of comfort. I've tried to do this without approaching wheelchair services as a friend who needs a wheelchair at all times had his taken off him after an ATOS review. This may have been a huge mistake. Even if the same happens to me, at least I'll have had a comfortable chair for a while, and I still have the Remploy one to fall back on.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 15 Jun 2017, 14:30

waste of time/money. Wheels too small, frame rigid, no proper suspension. No AIR in tyres... Small sidewalks transfer shock, small wheel jam up all over. And seat not comfortable...

If course theres also the saying:

Buy cheap pay twice.

Because you will waste time and money and achieve little, and eventually do what you say you cant afford AS WELL!
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 15 Jun 2017, 14:31

a friend who needs a wheelchair at all times had his taken off him after an ATOS review.


How is that possible if he REALLY needs one full time?
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Khreat » 16 Jun 2017, 18:33

Hey dude.
Been reading this as you're just along the coast road.
There are chairs that come up in the area for the low hundreds around here, and as John said wait it out and offer when they don't sell.
You would be better off trying for a funded chair though, if for nothing else that to get experience in a powered chair and be able to see what you need from one in real life rather than a showroom.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 21 Jun 2017, 18:50

Burgerman wrote:
a friend who needs a wheelchair at all times had his taken off him after an ATOS review.


How is that possible if he REALLY needs one full time?


I've really no idea. All was told is that he was reassessed and they'd taken it.
I know his ex was there every day, staying over and looking after him. She effectively moved in, and she and his daughter kept up carers duties between them.
I know they appealed and got his chair back, but for a while he'd lost it.

I need to keep checking back here. There has been a couple of times I've typed replies, been interrupted, come back and I've timed out.

@Khreat, Yeah, we're just at the coast. It sounds good, but the only time we have a few hundred in one go is Christmas. My hope was to be able to buy a motor here, a battery pack there when we can, and fit something together. Given time, it may be possible but it's clearly not practical. The chair I want will have to be provided.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 21 Jun 2017, 19:12

But ATOS are a benefits /work ability check agency. They dont decide if you need a wheelchair or not, or have any say in it. Not related in any way.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 21 Jun 2017, 20:35

I don't know what to tell you. That's what I was told.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 21 Jun 2017, 21:36

This is what they do. And are a private company.
Work Capability Assessment
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Work Capability Assessment (WCA) is the test used by the British Government's Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to decide whether jobless welfare claimants are entitled to sickness benefits.[1] A medical assessor gives the DWP a description of the claimant's disabilities and a recommendation on their work capability, after which the claimant is put into one of three categories:

Fit for work
Unfit for work but fit for "work-related activity"
Unfit for work and unfit for "work-related activity"

The assessments are usually carried out by nurses; a smaller number of physiotherapists also do the testing, and some types of claim can only be gauged by an appropriately-trained doctor. Face-to-face assessments typically last a little over an hour, including the time needed to complete a report of the findings and send it to the DWP. A civil servant uses this report, plus any other relevant information they have to hand, to decide on entitlement to Employment and Support Allowance or to an enhanced rate of Universal Credit, and on whether a successful claimant will be required to take part in "work-related activity".


A wheelchair assessment is between the doctor, and the NHS wheelchair services. And not related in any way to atos. So they are telling you something very odd. And cannot be true. If assessed as work capable then they get less disability benefit money. And may therefore lose free mobility cars (on the motability scheme, or the allowance), or income.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby FourQ » 22 Jun 2017, 14:21

Something definitely doesn't add up. I think I'll try to catch his ex for clarification.
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Re: Hi everyone

Postby Burgerman » 22 Jun 2017, 16:51

This isn't means tested.
For your interest.

NHS wheelchair services offer assessments to determine what type of wheelchair or mobility equipment you may be entitled to on the NHS.

In most cases, you'll be referred to the service by a hospital, doctor, consultant or occupational therapists. See the directory of wheelchair services for a full list of services.

In general, wheelchair services are available to people of all ages who have a long-term need for mobility help. However, the specific criteria for whether you're eligible are decided locally and will vary depending on where you live.

Before you can be offered a wheelchair, you'll have to undergo an assessment. This will determine if you're eligible and, if so, what type of mobility equipment is most appropriate. The assessment is normally carried out at NHS wheelchair services centres or clinics.

The people who assess you will all be health professionals, such as GPs, occupational therapists, or physiotherapists, and should include a "rehabilitation engineer" (someone who specialises in wheelchairs and seating). There is no one-size-fits-all policy, which means you will be assessed according to your individual needs. The assessment should take into account your physical and social needs, as well as the environment in which you live and work.

Many wheelchair services have a waiting list for assessment appointments, so you may have to wait several weeks after being referred to have an assessment.

Chairs can be adapted if necessary to meet your specific needs. This is particularly important for children, as their equipment must adjust to their growth and changing needs. If you feel that your wheelchair doesn't fit your current needs any more, contact your wheelchair service and they will reassess you.
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